listening lab 1219

 

Step 1: Read the questions below.

質問を読んでください。

 

1.  Where is all Champagne made? 

 

2.  What organization decides the rules for making Champagne? 

 

3.  How many main grape varieties are there in the Champagne region?  

 

4.  In the méthode Champenoise, is the wine fermented a second time in a tank or in the bottle? 

 

5.  Which doesn't the author recommend, sparkling wines from California or sparkling wines made by force-carbonating them? 

  

Step 2:  Listen to the audio and try to answer the questions.
オーディオを聞いて、 質問に答えて見て下さい。
 
Listening Lab - page 10
00:00 / 00:00

Step 3:  Listen again while you read the article.

記事を読みながら、もう一度聞いてみてください。
   

 

CHAMPAGNE

     A big celebration like Christmas or New Year's Eve calls for Champagne!  Or at least sparkling wine.  But what's the difference?  Well, to begin with, all Champagne is sparkling wine, but not all sparkling wine is Champagne.  That's because a sparkling wine can only be called Champagne if it is produced in the Champagne region of France according to strict rules.
 
     The organization that makes the rules about Champagne is called the Comité Interprofessionnel du vin de Champagne (CIVC), and the rules are quite complex. The CIVC decides what kind of grapes can be used, where and how the grapes must be grown, how the grapes must be pressed, how the wine must be fermented, etc.  Any wine, no matter how high the quality, that doesn't meet these requirements is not allowed to be called Champagne.
 
     One thing that might surprise you is that the grapes used to make Champagne are not all white.  The three main varieties used to make Champagne are Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier.  Chardonnay is a white grape variety, and Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier are red grapes.  These three makeup over 99% of the plantings in the Champagne region. Four other varieties can be used to make Champagne, but they make up less than .3% of all plantings.
 
     Sparkling wine, on the other hand, is any bubbly wine that does not meet the requirements to be called Champagne.  It can be made in other areas in France or in other countries.  It can be made with different grapes.  And the process can be, but does not have to be, the méthode Champenoise, which involves adding sugar to create a second fermentation in the bottle.  For example, in other areas of France, sparkling wines made using the méthode Champenoise are labeled "crémant."  In Italy and Spain, similar processes are used to make Prosecco and cava, respectively.  In Germany, most of the sekt is made using a slightly different process in which the wine is fermented in stainless-steel tanks instead of individual bottles.  Finally, there are the cheapest sparkling wines, which are made by simply forcing carbon dioxide into the bottle. These aren't very high quality, and I don't recommend them.
 
     But if you're looking for a festive drink to celebrate the holidays, don't worry, there are good options at every price point.  When choosing a bottle, look for words like "méthode Champenoise," "méthode traditionnelle," and "méthode classique." And don't be afraid to try a sparkling wine from California, Washington or Australia.  Better yet, try them all!     
 

Step 4:  Check your answers.

答えをチェックしてください。

 

1.  Where is all Champagne made? 

It's made in the Champagne region of France.

 

2.  What organization decides the rules for making Champagne? 

The CIVC does.

or   The Comité Interprofessionnel du vin de Champagne does.

 

3.  How many main grape varieties are there in the Champagne region? 

There are three main varieties.  

 

4.  In the méthode Champenoise, is the wine fermented a second time in a tank or in the bottle? 

It's fermented a second time in the bottle.

 

5.  Which doesn't the author recommend, sparkling wines from California or sparkling wines made by force-carbonating them? 

The author doesn't recommend wines made by force-carbonating them.

 

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