listening lab 0319

 

Step 1: Read the questions below.

質問を読んでください。

 

1.   How did the author find the Paper House?

2.    What is the frame of the house made of?

3.    Why did Stenman leave the walls unfinished?

4.     Where did the newspapers that cover the clock come from?

5.  Why hasn't the inside of the house been revarnished?

 
Step 2:  Listen to the audio and try to answer the questions.
オーディオを聞いて、 質問に答えて見て下さい。
 
Listening Lab - page 10
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Step 3:  Listen again while you read the article.

記事を読みながら、もう一度聞いてみてください。
   

 

 The Paper House
 
On a recent trip to Rockport, Massachusetts, I visited a quirky little house called the Paper House. It is a bit tricky to find, but I managed to find it thanks to my car's GPS.  The Paper House is exactly what it sounds like — a house made from paper.  It was built by Elis F. Stenman, the mechanical engineer who designed the machines that make paper clips.  Being an inventor, he liked doing things differently.   
 
In 1922, Stenman began building his summer home out of paper as a hobby.  He used wood for the frame, the floor and the roof.  For the walls, he thought paper would be good insulation, so he used layers and layers of newspaper held together with a glue that he made himself out of flour and water.  The paper was then varnished for protection.  Originally, he had intended to cover the insulation with wood, but he ended up leaving the walls unfinished. He wanted to see how well the paper would hold up. It has held up for almost 100 years! 
 
Stenman also made the furniture. Visitors will find a table and chairs completely made out of newspapers. The chairs are still sturdy enough to sit on! There is a piano, too, but it's a real piano that is only covered in newspapers. And the fireplace is a brick fireplace covered in newspapers. It isn't used today for fear of fire. And one of the most interesting pieces in the house is the grandfather clock.  It is covered in newspapers from each one of the 48 states that made up the U.S. at the time, and you can still read them.
 
Surprisingly, the house had electricity when it was built.  It also had running water in the summer, but there was no bathroom.  The outhouse, which was not made of paper, was nearby.  Stenman lived in the Paper House in the summertime up until 1930.  By that time, it  had already become a popular tourist attraction. The house is now cared for by Stenman's great-niece. The outside of the house gets a new coat of varnish every once in a while.  The inside hasn't been revarnished because each coat of varnish makes it harder to read the newspapers, and visitors get a kick out of reading the old headlines.
 
It only takes about 10 to 20 minutes to go through the whole house, so I wouldn't go out of your way to see it. But if you're already in the area, it's worth the trip!​
 

Step 4:  Check your answers.

答えをチェックしてください。

 

1.   How did the author find the Paper House?

He used his car's GPS.

2.    What is the frame of the house made of?

It's made of wood.

3.    Why did Stenman leave the walls unfinished?

Because he wanted to see how well the paper would hold up.

4.     Where did the newspapers that cover the clock come from?

They came from each of the 48 states that made up the U.S. at the time. 

5.  Why hasn't the inside of the house been revarnished?

Because each coat of varnish makes it harder to read the newspapers, and visitors like to read them.

 

 

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