listening lab 0219

 

Step 1: Read the questions below.

質問を読んでください。

 

1.  What did the author do when he got home from the restaurant?

2.   What famous historical figure is said to have loved tempura?

3.   Does the author think the name "tempura" came from "tempora" or "tempero"?

4.    In the Edo period, was tempura usually made by moms at home or sold by street vendors?

5. Which is commonly used for tempura these days, lard or canola oil?

 
Step 2:  Listen to the audio and try to answer the questions.
オーディオを聞いて、 質問に答えて見て下さい。
 
Listening Lab - page 10
00:00 / 00:00

 

Step 3:  Listen again while you read the article.

記事を読みながら、もう一度聞いてみてください。
   

 

 Tempura
 
Tempura is my favorite Japanese food.  The other day when I was eating some at a restaurant, I wondered what kind of oil the chef had used to make it so light and crispy.  That got me thinking about other things.  I wondered what kind of oil was used when tempura was first made and when Japanese started eating tempura, and things like that.  I decided to google it when I got home, and this is what I found out.    
 
Before tempura was invented, Japanese sometimes fried foods without breading or batter, and sometimes rice flour was used as a coating.  But in the 16th century, the Portuguese living in Nagasaki made fritters which were coated with a batter made of flour, water, eggs, and salt. The cooking method changed, for example salt was omitted and the batter was kept very cold, to make the dish we call "tempura" today, and it became very popular. They say it was Tokugawa Ieyasu's favorite dish! 
 
The name also comes by way of the Portuguese, but it's not clear exactly which origin story is correct.  One theory is that the name "tempura" comes from "tempora," which means "time" in Latin, because the Portuguese were Catholics who ate the fritters during a religious period called "quattuor tempora," when Catholics avoid red meat and instead eat fish or vegetables. Another theory is that it comes from "tempero," which means "seasoning" in Latin. My layman's guess is that it comes from "tempora" because I read that tempura in those days was not seasoned or served with a dipping sauce.  But that's just my guess.
 
Another interesting fact I discovered along the way was that tempura wasn't usually cooked at home. It was sold by street vendors. This is because cooking with oil in a house made of wood and paper was a fire hazard. That brings me back to my original question: what kind of oil did they use?  It seems that they used to use lard to fry things, including tempura, until oil became cheaper.  After that, one of the most commonly used oils was sesame oil. These days, it seems canola oil, corn oil, soybean oil, or some combination of those is most common.
 

Step 4:  Check your answers.

答えをチェックしてください。

 

1.  What did the author do when he got home from the restaurant?

He googled "tempura."

or  He looked up information about tempura.   

 

2.   What famous historical figure is said to have loved tempura?

Tokugawa Ieyasu is said to have loved tempura.

 

3.   Does the author think the name "tempura" came from "tempora" or "tempero"?

He thinks it came from "tempora."

4.    In the Edo period, was tempura usually made by moms at home or sold by street vendors?

It was sold by street vendors.

 

5. Which is commonly used for tempura these days, lard or canola oil?

Canola oil is. 

 

 

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