listening lab 0217

 

Step 1: Read the questions below.

質問を読んでください。

 

1.  Was the Women's March on January 20th or January 21st?

 

2.  Who was the Women's march started by?

 

3.  What was one of the many rights the protesters wanted to protect? 

 

4.   How many people participated in the march in Washington, D.C.? 

 

5.  What was the most remarkable thing about the protest?

 

Step 2:  Listen to the audio and try to answer the questions.
オーディオを聞いて、 質問に答えて見て下さい。
 
Listening Lab - page 10
00:00 / 00:00

 

Step 3:  Listen again while you read the article.

記事を読みながら、もう一度聞いてみてください。
 
   Donald Trump was sworn in as president on Friday, January 20, 2017.  According to the New York Times, crowd counting experts estimated that 160,000 people attended the public inauguration ceremony that day.  Because his election was so controversial, there were also a few groups of protesters that day. But the day after Trump's inauguration was a worldwide protest called the Women's March.
 
  The Women's March on Washington, as the main protest was called, was a grassroots movement. That means it was organized from the bottom up not from the top down. In fact, it started with just one woman's post on Facebook and grew and grew. That woman, Teresa Shook, is a retired grandma from Hawaii.  She created a Facebook event and invited friends to march on Washington in protest.  Similar Facebook events popped up, and soon thousands of women were planning to attend. Several of the organizers decided to join forces, and they created the official Women's March on Washington website.
 
   The goal of the march was to send a message to the new Trump administration and to the world that women's rights are human rights.  Signs, chants, and speeches called for the new administration to protect women's reproductive rights, protect immigrants' rights, religious rights, and gender and racial rights.  In addition, they called for the administration to protect the environment because they believe everyone has the right to clean water, clean air, and access to public lands.
 
   The march was a bigger success than anyone had expected in terms of turnout.  Officials who organized the marches later reported that 673 marches took place worldwide in 81 countries and on seven continents.  Yes, even in Antarctica.  The biggest protests were in America.  In Washington, D.C., nearly 500,000 attended, but all of the major cities, including Chicago, Los Angeles, New York City, Boston, and Seattle, had huge crowds.  Even small towns held marches.  It is estimated that a total of 3.3–4.6 million people participated in the United States and up to 4.8 million did worldwide.  
 
    The most remarkable thing about the Women's March is that the crowds were so peaceful; there were no protesters arrested on that day.  Another remarkable thing is that the movement seems to be gaining momentum.  The organizers of the Women's March on Washington have posted the "10 Actions for the First 100 Days" campaign.  You can find more information on the organizers' official website, www.womensmarch.com.

  

Step 4:  Check your answers.

答えをチェックしてください。

 

  1.  Was the Women's March on January 20th or January 21st?

It was on January 21st.

 

2.   Who was the Women's march started by?

It was started by a retired grandma in Hawaii.

 

3.  What was one of the many rights the protesters wanted to protect?  

One (of the rights they wanted to protect is) is women's reproductive rights.

One (of the rights they wanted to protect is) is immigrants' rights.

One (of the rights they wanted to protect is) is religious rights.

One (of the rights they wanted to protect is) is gender rights. 

One (of the rights they wanted to protect is) is racial rights.

One is the right to clean water, clean air, and access to public lands.

 

4.  How many people participated in the march in Washington, D.C.?

Nearly 500,000 people participated.  

 

5.  What was the most remarkable thing about the protest?

It was that the crowds were peaceful.

It was that there were no arrests.

 

 

  • facebook-square
  • Twitter Square
home  •  site map

© 2020

 ET PEOPLE!